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Summer Undergraduate Courses

AH 100: Art Matters $0.00

Course Description

A first-year foundation experience, this course introduces students to the interpretation of art, architecture, and design. The course is not a survey class. Rather, it focuses on teaching students how historians, curators, and critics approach the study of art, architecture, and design in context – the types of questions they ask and the methods they use to answer those questions. Different sections of this course will focus on specific themes that will guide the content of each section. When registering, students will have the opportunity to list their order of preference for the themes offered each semester. Students in all sections will complete a common series of art-historical writing assignments and will receive instruction in library use and research.

AH 201: Modernism & After $0.00

Course Description

Offers a survey of avant-garde European and American art from the mid-19th century to the present. Some of the many artistic movements covered include Realism, Impressionism, post-Impressionism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, de Stijl, early American Modernism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and post-Modernism. Prerequisite: AH 100.

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

AH 490: Topics in World Art and Architecture: Gardens $1620.00

Course Description

This course explores the relationship among gardens, buildings, and human beings throughout history from ancient Mesopotamia to contemporary America. Putting equal emphasis on eastern and western traditions, it discusses interactions among different civilizations and their impact on the design of gardens and pavilions. This course also examines contemporary approaches in studying gardens through landscape, architectural, and artistic lenses. It also covers the cultural, political, social, metaphysical, and materialistic context of gardens. Prerequisite: AH 201.

CWRT 326: Intermediate Poetry Workshop $0.00

Course Description

In this poetry writing course, we will collectively engage in poiesis—the process of making—by balancing tradition with innovation, curiosity with critical thinking, and discipline with play. As a foundation for our writing, we will consider 20th and 21st century poems and poetry collections (with occasional poems from other time periods), along with a few works in other mediums. In addition to the readings, students will be responsible for generating new poems each week, for giving one another nuanced, well-considered feedback in weekly workshop sessions, and for attending a least one literary reading over the course of the semester. Students will also submit final portfolio of polished poems from over the course of the semester, which will include a critical summary of their revision choices.

DR 252: Life Drawing $0.00

Course Description

This intensive study of the nude explores issues of form, structure, volume, movement, and composition. Expressive possibilities are also explored and practiced. Prerequisites: FF 198 and FF 199. Recommended sophomore course

This class is full

This class is full

This class is full

GD 360: Branding $0.00

Course Description

Students explore the comprehensive branding process by creating functional design solutions. The student gains a new level of understanding of how design and communication can help define a organization’s message or product as well as engage how it performs. The course investigates the brand positioning process, strategic thinking, brand case studies, integrated brand communications, the launch of new products, target audiences, and a collaborative design process. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

This class is full

IA 202: Introduction to Sound $0.00

Course Description

This course is designed to provide a basic framework for recording, editing, and composing with sound in a variety of media. No prior production knowledge is assumed. Classes will focus on creative projects, while establishing a common technical and aesthetic vocabulary through in-class demonstrations and discussions. Sound processing, editing, and performance software such as Reason, Ableton Live, audiomulch, and turntables will be covered.

This class is full

IL 228: Character Design $0.00

Course Description

Students will delve into a universe where character is king, and where good character design is taught through an emphasis on idea, shape, structure, and fun factor. The goal: to create characters that captivate the eye, provoke the mind, and pull the viewer into their world. Students will learn how to breathe life into their characters though drawing from the model, studying the anatomy, and observing movement. These ideals will be reinforced by watching them in action through inspiring art presentations, animated films/shorts and video games.

This class is full

IL 238: Digital Illustration $0.00

Course Description

In this class projects start with sketches and them move quickly to the digital realm. Assignments emphasize traditional illustration skills such as visual problem-solving, rendering, and drawing, while exploring the digital possibilities to execute the artwork. Students spend half of their time in the studio working on sketches and concepts. They spend the second half of their time executing these assignments in digital programs. The emphasis will be on Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop. Crossing software and mixing media are encouraged.

This class is full

LIT 391: Novel Sexualities $0.00

Course Description

Have heterosexuality and homosexuality always existed? If not, when and how did they emerge and what is meant exactly by these terms? What role might novels play in registering, shaping, defining and even producing certain forms of sexuality? In order to address these questions, the course will pair key moments in the history of sexuality in the United States and Western Europe from the 19th century to the present with landmark novels. In addition to novels, we will read medical, legal and theoretical texts, as well as magazine and newspaper articles. We will end with a contemporary unit that asks what role popular culture might now play in the generation of new forms of sexuality. Through such inquiries, students will learn to historically ground their reasoning, acquire a critical understanding of sexuality and explore the relationship between novels and the production of sexuality.

PT 150: Painting I $0.00

Course Description

Presents the fundamental principles and techniques of painting. Through a wide range of problems, students learn about preparation of various supports, use of painting tools, color mixing, and analyzing surface qualities. Integration of drawing and design concepts are emphasized as students investigate color-value connections, articulation of form, composition, and spatial relationships. Working primarily from observation, students explore subjects ranging from still life, interiors, landscapes, and cityscapes, to self-portraits and the figure.

PT 200: Painting II $0.00

Course Description

Consolidates concepts and methods from FF 150 Painting I and leads students to expanded perceptual awareness. Projects may include still life, landscape, and the figure, as well as abstract and conceptual concerns to enhance each student's formal and personal development. There is ongoing concern with painting materials and techniques. May not be repeated for credit.

This class is full

This class is full

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