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Open Studies Course Registration

Summer Undergraduate Courses

AH 100: Art Matters $1650.00

Course Description

A first-year foundation experience, this course introduces students to the interpretation of art, architecture, and design. The course is not a survey class. Rather, it focuses on teaching students how historians, curators, and critics approach the study of art, architecture, and design in context – the types of questions they ask and the methods they use to answer those questions. Different sections of this course will focus on specific themes that will guide the content of each section. Students in all sections will complete a common series of art-historical writing assignments and will receive instruction in library use and research.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Instructor: Raél Salley
Credits: 3.00

AH 201: Modernism & After $1650.00

Course Description

Offers a survey of avant-garde European and American art from the mid-19th century to the present. Some of the many artistic movements covered include Realism, Impressionism, post-Impressionism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, de Stijl, early American Modernism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and post-Modernism.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM
Instructor: Raél Salley
Credits: 3.00

AH 367: Women as Creators $1650.00

Course Description

This course explores the contributions of women to the world of art as creators of both traditional fine arts and crafts. This broad chronological study surveys the artistic creations of women from a global perspective. Prerequisites: AH 100 and AH 201.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Kimberly Anderson
Credits: 3.00

AH 375: Arts of Native America $1650.00

Course Description

This course explores Native American art from pre-history to the present. Students will focus on the artists, their cultures, and the role of art in 21st-century Native identity, in the larger North American context. Prerequisites: AH 201. Instructor: Katherine Fernstrom received her PhD in Anthropology, with a specialty in Archeology, from Southern Illinois University. She was Associate Curator in the Baltimore Museum of Art’s Department of The Arts of Africa, Asia, the Americas & Oceania.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Instructor: Katharine Fernstrom
Credits: 3.00

AN 263: Sound Design for Animators $1650.00

Course Description

From Disney to Laika to Augenblick - Animation as a motion picture medium has lead to innumerable advancements in the craft of cinematic sound. In this studio course, students will explore the practice of sound and voice recording, sound design, Foley art, and mixing for the animated image. Students will be learning how animation benefits from well crafted sound and how sound can aid in telling a film's story. The course will focus on learning the tools of the trade including Pro Tools and Audition, in addition to the use of props, sound effects libraries, and the human voice. Also, students will be introduced to the history and theory of the art form and the ways in which it has evolved over time. Instructor: Andrew Paul Keiper is a sound artist based in Baltimore, where he received his MFA from MICA's Photographic and Electronic Media program in 2016. He teaches in the in the Animation and Interactive Arts programs at MICA and has exhibited his work in Baltimore, New York City, Philadelphia, New Jersey and Washington DC.

Section A meets May 28, 2019 to June 25, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Andrew Keiper
Credits: 3.00

AN 264: Rendering, Materials, Lighting and PBR Workflows $1650.00

Course Description

This course will explore lighting and rendering, both in real time and rendered environments. We will focus on Physically Based Rendering (PBR) theory and practice, and explore production pipeline best practices. Instructor: Lucas Feld is a working 3d Artist specializing in real time applications. He has over 20 years of experience in Games, Film, Television and VR/AR production.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Lucas Feld
Credits: 3.00

CE 309: Anagama Kiln Firing $2000.00

Course Description

A unique opportunity for students to fire in an Anagama — a traditional, Japanese-style, wood-burning kiln. In the first three weeks of the class, held in MICA’s ceramics studio, students create the greenware forms to be fired in the Anagama kiln atmosphere. In-class work is supplemented by slide lectures and demonstrations. Unfired pieces are packed and readied for transport to the kiln. In the last eight days of the class, students reside in scenic Pennsylvania to begin the five-day firing cycle. Hands-on work allows students to participate in each stage of the firing process, including cutting and stacking six cords of wood. After unloading work it is then transported back to MICA and a final formal critique will be scheduled. Prerequisites: Ceramics experience is required. Note: Materials, kiln fees, wood, transportation to the kiln in Pennsylvania, and cabin rental (located a short distance from the kiln in Lake Nockamixon State Park, Quakertown, PA) are included in the price of the class. The final class is a requirement. (PRICE INCLUDES: $1,650 tuition + $350 materials fee.) Instructor: Sarah Barnes has been the MICA Ceramics Studio Manager and on the adjunct faculty since 1995. She specializes in wood firing functionally based work. Sarah co-founded the MICA Art Market—a venue that brings together staff, students, alumni, and faculty to sell handmade art to the public.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 21, 2019
On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Sarah Barnes
Credits: 3.00

DR 252: Life Drawing $1650.00

Course Description

Intensive study of the nude explores issues of form, structure, volume, movement, and composition. Expressive possibilities are also explored and practiced.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Daniel Riesmeyer
Credits: 3.00

DR 298X: Studio Drawing: Painterly $1650.00

Course Description

This course emphasizes issues of representational drawing and draftsmanship that reach beyond their most familiar and traditional linear expression to incorporate greater range of mark-making and media as in works of such artists as Rembrandt, Goya, Tiepolo, and Diebenkorn. Students explore relationships among line and mass, observation, and experimentation. Fulfills studio drawing requirement. Recommended sophomore course. Prerequisites: FF 198 and FF 199 or Post-Baccalaureate student standing. Instructor: Originally from Long Island, NY and Connecticut, Jim Condron earned his MFA at the Hoffberger School of Painting at MICA and a BA in Art and English from Colby College. He also studied at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture. His work appears nationally and internationally in galleries and museums as well as in corporate, university, public and private collections.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: James Condron
Credits: 3.00

DR 393: Watercolor Technique $1650.00

Course Description

Introduces basic and advanced techniques of watercolor as applied in a variety of disciplines. Emphasis is given to the handling of wash area and brush strokes in experimental and traditional ways, color mixing, and uses and representation of volume spaces. Note: No class on June 14, 16 and 18. Instructor: Suzy Kopf completed her MFA in Studio Art at the Maryland Institute College of Art and holds a BFA in Fine Arts from Parsons and a BA in Art History from Eugene Lang College. She teaches watercolor media and museum studies at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland Institute College of Art and Anne Arundel Community College. She recently completed a year long grant-funded project with the Baltimore Streetcar Museum and has upcoming solo shows at the Baltimore Architecture Foundation, The Museum of Industry and IA&A Hilyear in Washington, DC.

Section A meets May 31, 2019 to June 21, 2019
On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Suzanne Kopf
Credits: 3.00

FB 102: Hanbok $1485.00

Course Description

In this special projects course, students will work with international faculty and guests from South Korea to explore the traditional garment of the Hanbok. Students will learn the theory, history and cultural aspects of Hanbok as garment and costume, while gaining skill in machine and hand stitching, embroidery, hand-painting, and dyeing. The class will be comprised of international students making for cultural exchange of ideas, ways of working, and collaborative making. The course will culminate in an exhibition of samples and innovative approaches to learned traditions. Prerequisites: Basic sewing machine skills are required and/or FB 200 (Introduction to Fiber) equivalent or permission of instructor.

Section A meets June 3, 2019 to June 14, 2019
On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Michelle Longway
Credits: 1.50

FILM 220: Explorations in 16MM: Theory and Practice $1650.00

Course Description

This course is open to beginners as well as filmmakers who have had experience working with 16mm but want to explore new ways of thinking and working with the medium. We will focus on various movements of avant-garde cinema and contemporary artist run movements around the world, including DIY and innovative ways in which people are working with 16mm film today. We will watch a variety of 16mm films and read writings on and by filmmakers who work with 16mm. Students will be working with the hand-cranked 16mm Bolex Reflex cameras and the Steenbeck flatbed editing machines to create and explore their own ideas. Note: No class on May 27.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 27, 2019
On Monday, Wednesday, Thursday from 5:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Instructor: Margaret Rorison
Credits: 3.00

GD 360: Branding $1650.00

Course Description

Students gain a new level of understanding of how design and communication can help define an organization’s message or product as well as engage how it performs. The course investigates the brand positioning process, strategic thinking, brand case studies, integrated brand communications, target audiences, and a collaborative design process. Note: May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 21, 2019
On Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Hayelin Choi
Credits: 3.00

HMST 270: Bio-Medical Ethics $1650.00

Course Description

This course will study a number of traditional Medical Ethics topics including but not all of: abortion, the care of the dying, organ transplants, informed consent in therapy and experimentation, adequate health care and its just distribution, control of human behavior by drugs, surgery, test-tube reproduction, population control, genetic engineering and counseling. Of particular concern will be topics involving emerging technologies such as CRISPR-Cas 9 gene editing, Robotic Surgery, Face Transplants, 3D printing of Pharmaceuticals, and issues related to cyborgs including Trans and Post Humanism. No class on May 27.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 26, 2019
On Monday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Instructor: - TBA
Credits: 3.00

IL 228: Character Design $1650.00

Course Description

Students will delve into a universe where character is king, and where good character design is taught through an emphasis on idea, shape, structure, and fun factor. The goal: to create characters that captivate the eye, provoke the mind, and pull the viewer into their world. Students will learn how to breathe life into their characters though drawing from the model, studying the anatomy, and observing movement. These ideals will be reinforced by watching them in action through inspiring art presentations, animated films/shorts and video games.

Section A meets May 23, 2019 to June 24, 2019
On Monday, Tuesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: James Giegerich
Credits: 3.00

IS 320: Introduction to Digital Fabrication $1650.00

Course Description

Digital fabrication is literally reshaping the world around us. Digital modes of designing, thinking, and making are embodied the buildings we inhabit, the clothes we wear, the artworks we experience, and even the food we eat. The integration of design software, precision robotics, and innovative systems of making opens up exciting new possibilities for artists and designers. It also introduces fundamental shifts in our ways of making, our economy, and our society. It demands our consideration as citizens and our thoughtful use as makers. In this course students will develop proficiency in computer aided design (CAD) working in Rhino, and learn to safely and effectively use laser cutters, 3D printers, and the CNC router. Through research, discussion, and practice students will learn to think about and through these tools to develop a personal relationship with these technologies in order to integrate them into their practice.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Amanda Agricola
Credits: 3.00

LIT 364-TH: Reading Freud $1650.00

Course Description

This course offers a chance for in-depth study of a seminal 20th-century thinker. Texts (sometimes excerpts and sometimes entire works) include The Interpretation of Dreams, The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious, Moses and Monotheism, Totem and Taboo, and Beyond the Pleasure Principle. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course. Instructor: Firmin DeBrabander studied Philosophy at Boston College and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium, and received his Ph.D. in the field from Emory University in 2002. His specialties include the History of Western Philosophy, Ethics, Political Theory, and Environmental Ethics. He also teaches courses on Media Ethics, Economic Theory, Eastern Philosophy, Philosophy of Science, and Medical Ethics.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 13, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 10:00 AM to 1:15 PM
Instructor: Firmin DeBrabander
Credits: 3.00

PH 262: Digital Photography I $1650.00

Course Description

An introductory level course that explores the conceptual and practical principles of digital photography through lectures, readings, hands-on assignments, and field trips. Discussion topics focus on camera operation, file formats, the impact of digital technology on contemporary photographic practice, as well as the aesthetic and ethical issues surrounding it. Adobe Lightroom, Photoshop, and other software applications are used to explore creative and experimental possibilities for processing and manipulating photographs. Studio work emphasizes printed, still imagery, but students are encouraged to devise new uses for their digital materials. Introduction to input and output peripherals will include digital cameras, scanners, and printers.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 19, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Nicholas Simko
Credits: 3.00

PR 218: Screenprinting $1650.00

Course Description

This course explores the different possibilities of water-based screen-printing in a professional printshop atmosphere. Techniques such as digital film outputting, mixing gradations with ink, multi-color registration, and four color process printing are demonstrated and employed. Through independent projects, demonstrations, and critiques, students are encouraged to create a cohesive body of work. Prerequisites: FF 100 and FF 198. Suggested for all printmaking majors in their sophomore or junior year. May not be repeated for credit.

Section A meets May 28, 2019 to June 13, 2019
On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: Robert Tillman
Credits: 3.00

PT 201: Introduction to Painting $1650.00

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basic principles and techniques of painting. Through a wide range of experiences, students will learn about painting tools, basic color-mixing, composition, form, and spatial relationships. Students will engage with a variety of subjects ranging from still-life, interiors, abstraction, self portraits and the figure.

Section A meets May 24, 2019 to June 21, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: - TBA
Credits: 3.00

PT 250: Personal Directions $1650.00

Course Description

This course is a studio class geared to students who have a sense of commitment to painting. It provides a communal studio experience, providing a supportive and critical environment where students can develop their own voice and direction. This course embraces varied mediums and broad approaches to painting. Students’ ideas and work will grow through their own personal experience, as well as, the shared challenges and experiences of their classmates. This course includes individual and group critiques, and slide presentations.

Section A meets May 23, 2019 to June 20, 2019
On Tuesday, Thursday, Friday from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Instructor: - TBA
Credits: 3.00

SSCI 223-IH2: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology $1650.00

Course Description

Humanity is a puzzle: we have highly developed intellects, yet again and again we make terrible decisions; we are co-operative yet also intensely selfish. We create beautiful art yet leave the world in an ugly mess. We create technologies which generate great wealth yet most of humanity lives in abject poverty. Why is humanity like this? How does the world work? Cultural Anthropology tries to solve these puzzles of our contemporary existence. Frequently its method is comparison. By looking at other cultures we realize that much of our own taken for granted life is neither natural nor universal. In this introductory course, we trace the history of the discipline, from it origins to the present day. MEETS IH-2 REQUIREMENT Instructor: Ruth E. Toulson is a cultural anthropology who received her PhD from the University of Cambridge, England. She conducts fieldwork in Southeast Asia and Mainland China, where she examines relationship between religion and politics. Broadly, she focuses on processes of religious transformation: why are some ritual practices discarded, seemingly without regret, while others become orthopraxy? And why do state measures designed to transform citizens' religious beliefs so often fail? At MICA, she teaches classes on death, childhood, and material culture.

Section A meets May 22, 2019 to June 13, 2019
On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 10:00 AM to 1:15 PM
Instructor: Ruth Toulson
Credits: 3.00