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title - - -

The Address Book Libération (Paris, France: 1973)

author/s - - -

Calle, Sophie
Baggio, Pauline

call number - - -

N7433.4 .C35 A73 2012 Cage

press/es - - -

Siglio

publisher - - -

Los Angeles: Siglio, 2012.

description - - -

1 v. (unpaged): ill. (some col.); 19 cm.

edition - - -

1st ed.

note/s - - -

Translated from the French.

Originally published in Libération, Aug. 2-Sept. 4, 1983.

Having found a lost address book on the street in Paris, Calle copied the pages before returning it anonymously to its owner. She then embarked on a search to come to know this stranger by contacting listed individuals--in essence, following him through the map of his acquaintances. Originally published as a serial in the newspaper Libération over the course of one month, her incisive written accounts with friends, family and colleagues, juxtaposed with photographs, yield vivid subjective impressions of the address book's owner, Pierre D., while also suggesting ever more complicated stories as information is parsed and withheld by the people she encounters…. This is the first trade publication in English of The Address Book. (Gemini G.E.L. in Los Angeles released a suite of lithographs modeled on the original tabloid pages from Libération in an edition of 24)."--Publisher's web site, viewed March 21, 2013.

The Address Book, a key and controversial work in Sophie Calle's oeuvre, lies at the epicenter of many layers of reality and fiction. Having found a lost address book on the street in Paris, Calle copied the pages before returning it anonymously to its owner. She then embarked on a search to come to know this stranger by contacting listed individuals - in essence, following him through the map of his acquaintances. Originally published as a serial in the newspaper 'Libération' over the course of one month, her incisive written accounts with friends, family and colleagues, juxtaposed with photographs, yield vivid subjective impressions of the address book's owner, Pierre D., while also suggesting ever more complicated stories as information is parsed and withheld by the people she encounters. Collaged through a multitude of details - from the banal to the luminous, this fragile and strangely intimate portrait of Pierre D. is a prism through which to see the desire for, and the elusivity of, knowledge.